Sunday is Easter and not only do we celebrate the resurrection of Jesus Christ, but it also means spending time with family.

Lots of families will get ready for Easter this weekend by dyeing eggs and  preparing the family meal which normally consists of the traditional ham dinner. Growing up as a child I remember going tp church, family dinner and hunting Easter eggs in the backyard. Not only did I remember dyeing eggs  but I remember my parents teaching me and my brother about our hispanic heritage on how to make cascarones - confetti-filled eggs.

It's a tradition that's been around for decades and still celebrated today not only in Mexican culture but has spread into a worldwide celebration. The word cascarones, comes from the Spanish word cascarone or cascara which means "egg shell." So instead of just decorating an egg, here's what you need to do to make cascarones.

First, you remove the egg from the shell by poking a small pinhole in the bottom of the egg and replace the yoke with colorful confetti. So as to not waste the egg you can use the drained eggs to make other desserts and tasty treats for the Easter holiday. The best part of making cascarones is to find an unsuspecting friend and crack the confetti-filled eggs over his head by surprise.

According to the website Ehow you can learn more about its origin, purpose, symbolism and use. You may be surprised to learn about its religious meaning and the good luck it could bring you. And for some great recipes check out the website Muy Bueno.

The American-Hispanic culture has embraced this tradition that's been passed down through generations and is not only celebrated at Easter time but can even now be found to be celebrated during other holidays throughout the year. Believe me when I say that your children will enjoy, making these eggs, enjoy getting them in their Easter basket and enjoy cracking the confetti-filled shells. I would advise keeping the egg-cracking part outside, however.

Please watch these videos to see how to make cascarones.