Remember last month? Snowmageddon? Did you know that FEMA is trying to locate everyone that needs help getting the damage repaired?.

This means everyone, FEMA is committed to helping all eligible disaster survivors. That includes U.S. citizens, non-citizen nationals and qualified aliens. If you do not meet the citizenship or immigration status, you can still apply through another adult household member who is a citizen, or through a minor child who was born in the United States and has a Social Security number. 

There are many useful resources available to help you repair your home and help you reduce future risks of disaster. FEMA’s Community Education and Outreach Specialists can assist you on your recovery journey. Call 833-FEMA-4-US (833-336-2487) or email a mitigation specialist at FEMA-TXMit@fema.dhs.gov.

Other resources to help Texans repair and rebuild safer and stronger are online at:
https://fema.connectsolutions.com/txmit
https://fema.connectsolutions.com/tx-es-mit

Since the Feb. 19 federal disaster declaration for the winter storms in Texas, more than $103.9 million in assistance has been approved for survivors in the designated 126 counties.

FEMA and state officials are warning consumers about scam artists, identity thieves and other criminals trying to take advantage of disaster survivors. Report any suspicious activity to FEMA’s Fraud Tip line at 866-223-0814 or FEMA-OCSO-Tipline@fema.dhs.gov Or, contact the Texas Attorney General’s Consumer Protection Hotline at 800-621-0508 or go online.

Survivors of the severe winter storms can make it easier to communicate with FEMA by creating an online account. You can upload documents and check the status of your application from anywhere with an internet connection. Visit www.DisasterAssistance.gov

FEMA will conduct virtual home inspections for applicants who reported damage from February’s winter storms. Inspectors will call applicants to initiate the inspection, which in many cases can be offered via video streaming using FaceTime or Zoom. FEMA inspectors are trained to assist applicants with downloading and/or signing up for Zoom if necessary.

Disaster assistance may include monetary awards to help pay for emergency home repairs for disaster-related damage to a primary residence, uninsured and underinsured personal property losses, and other serious disaster-related expenses. For more information about last month’s winter storms, visit www.fema.gov/disaster/4586.

• To register with FEMA, go to: www.diasasterassistance.gov
• Or call 1 800-621-3362.
• Registration deadline is April 21.

Federal and State Agency Resources

While not all survivors of February’s winter storms are eligible for FEMA assistance there may be other state and federal assistance available to them, including:
o The Texas Health and Human Services Commission is allowing Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) recipients to use their food benefits to purchase hot foods and ready-to-eat meals due to impacts from the severe winter storms. SNAP recipients can also apply for lost or destroyed food.

Texas residents who lost their jobs, along with self-employed individuals who have been unable to work due to damage sustained from the recent winter storms, can apply for Disaster Unemployment Assistance (DUA). The Texas Workforce Commission (TWC) is accepting applications until March 26, 2021, for 108 counties and until April 1, 2021, for 18 counties.

The U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) has approved more than $46.6 million in low-interest loans to help Texas businesses and residents recover. Businesses, nonprofits, homeowners and renters who sustained damage are encouraged to apply for a loan prior to SBA’s April 21 deadline.

Texas residents who lost their jobs, along with self-employed individuals who have been unable to work due to damage sustained from the recent winter storms, can apply for Disaster Unemployment Assistance (DUA). The Texas Workforce Commission (TWC) is accepting applications until March 26, 2021, for 108 counties and until April 1, 2021, for 18 counties.

The U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) has approved more than $46.6 million in low-interest loans to help Texas businesses and residents recover. Businesses, nonprofits and residents who sustained damage are encouraged to apply for a loan prior to SBA’s April 21 deadline.

Designated Counties (counties in our listening area are highlighted)
Anderson, Angelina, Aransas, Atascosa, Austin, Bandera, Bastrop, Bee, Bell, Bexar, Bosque, Bowie, Blanco, Brazoria, Brazos, Brooks, Brown, Burleson, Burnet, Caldwell, Calhoun, Cameron, Chambers, Cherokee, Collin, Colorado, Comal, Comanche, Cooke, Coryell, Dallas, Denton, DeWitt, Deval, Eastland, Ector, Ellis, Erath, Falls, Fannin, Fort Bend, Freestone, Galveston, Gillespie, Goliad, Gonzalez, Grayson, Gregg, Grimes, Guadalupe, Hardin, Harris, Harrison, Hays, Henderson, Hidalgo, Hill, Hood, Houston, Howard, Hunt, Jackson, Jasper, Jefferson, Jim Hogg, Jim Wells, Johnson, Jones, Karnes, Kaufman, Kendall, Kleberg, Lavaca, Leon, Liberty, Limestone, Llano, Lubbock, Medina, Madison, Matagorda, Maverick, McLennan, Milam, Montague, Montgomery, Nacogdoches, Navarro, Newton, Nueces, Orange, Palo Pinto, Panola, Parker, Polk, Robertson, Rockwall, Rusk, Sabine, San Jacinto, San Patricio, Scurry, Shelby, Smith, Stephens, Tarrant, Taylor, Tom Green, Travis, Trinity, Tyler, Upshur, Val Verde, Van Zandt, Victoria, Walker, Waller, Washington, Webb, Wharton, Wichita, Willacy, Williamson, Wilson, Wise and Wood.

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